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Wednesday, October 29, 2014

Realville, USA

Welcome to Realville, USA.
It is where we live at Kodabow.
 When Jim Aken talked to us in early 2014 about heading to Africa to shoot a Hippo and asked if we had a Kodabow up to the task, we replied that while our current lineup would be fine for anything in North America, we didn't have a bow we felt that was suitable for taking down a 8,000 beast with a hide as tough as nails. Then we added, " but we will make one for you." This was the beginning of the birth of the Dangerous Game Kodabow - Special Order Item....now available in 2015.

A few months passed and we knew Jim was probably wondering about the Kodabow team. His departure date was closing in but he we had not shipped his bow. But Jim  patiently waited and one day, a brown box showed up on his doorstep. The rest is history as he was successful taking the first documented SCI Hippo with a crossbow. The Hippo "expired" 3 to 4 minutes after the first arrow left his Kodabow.

As a hunter and a manufacturer, we will not send a gent 10,000 miles to the other side of the world with a product that we believe has the smallest chance for failure. It just isn't right. And candidly, if you walk 100 yards out your back door and hunt on 10 acres for whitetail, the same type of logic applies. We don't want to let you down. You need to do your part. You need to read the directions and follow the Instruction Manual. You need to make the shot. But keep in mind that we have done our part and your Kodabow is representative of our best work.

Jim Aken -   First ever SCI documented Crossbow Hippopotamus
#1 in the Record Book 

Anything mechanical can potentially have an issue. Our part is to minimize that probability and we do a great job at it - to the point that we don't worry about Jim on the other side of the world. That is not the norm it appears. Today, it seems there are frequent and numerous product recalls in the crossbow industry.


What do we do? We actually shoot every crossbow that leaves our facility. Always have.
The Kodabow product design is excellent. At the QC level, we don't have issues with Major Failures. If lever or part doesn't move just right .... feel good, we might need to remove a small metal burr or add some lubrication but we are working off a solid quality base of design, materials and components. We are not going to see Jim travel to Africa with a Kodabow and then need to call him up and say "oops - we screwed up.....we got sloppy. We made a mistake."  Many of the recalls involve triggers and safeties. We just read a communication from a manufacturer that tells consumers to never pull the trigger on a crossbow while the Crossbow Safety is in the SAFE mode. It can result in an accidental discharge.
That's a little odd in terms of guidance.
(Keep in mind that if there is significant movement in any crossbow trigger while the bow is in the SAFE mode, it is possible that the trigger sear is being advanced too much - not good. The bow might fire unexpectedly.) 

In Realville, USA, we find that EVERY SHOOTER pulls the trigger on a crossbow when the Safety is set to SAFE. We purposely do that ourselves when we test triggers. Nearly 100% of the folks do it on our factory range at one point or another because they simply "forget" to move the Safety to FIRE. They do it in the woods as a deer approaches and they get excited. They might do it as a 8,000 lb Hippo decides to turn around and head back towards the ground blind you are sitting in. We expect the Kodabow to work and we depend on it. Crossbows are hard to make. We know that. But we are not going to send you "out there" with anything but the best .......so if you plan on taking a 10,000 mile trip with your Kodabow, be assured that we have gone the extra mile back here in Realville --- it requires a more effort but we know how important confidence in your hunting equipment is -- whether you are in Africa or in Wisconsin. 
 
Chuck @ Kodabow Crossbows


4 comments:

  1. Good post, sounds like a good QC department.

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  2. Would be curious as to the lbs of draw # used for this 4-ton critter.

    I'd also like to give a word of advice on any African hunt; it should stress that the animal(s) were in need of thinning and that ALL meat was used by nearby villages and $'s paid went to verifiable good use. This will round out a good report to all, even the skeptics or even anti-hunters to see and realize the usefulness//place hunting properly for the good of ALL can be ~!

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  3. mtman2 is so correct!. In this case, by prior agreement, the local tribal chief was awarded 50% of the meat which was smoked at night and turned into jerky with the remainder of the game going to the camp and families (about 100 people). The hunting fees likely paid the annual salaries for several government conservation officers (one accompanied the party during the hunt). What worked here was a 1210 gr arrow moving about 215 fps.

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